60-SECOND FILM REVIEWS

NowShowing

New movies showing in Minneapolis

By Wendy Schadewald (Rating system: 4=Don’t miss, 3=Good, 2=Worth a look, 1=Forget it)

“The 12th Man” (NR) (4) [Subtitled] — After the Gestapo capture eleven Norwegian resistance fighters (Vegar Hoel, Daniel Frikstad, Håkon T. Nielsen, Eirik Risholm Velle, Eric Dirnes, et al.), who were trained in Scotland, in March 1943 in this gripping, intense, factually based, well-acted, gut-wrenching, 135-minute thriller based Petter Skavlan’s novel, last tenacious, stubborn surviving Norwegian team member Jan Baalsrud (Thomas Gullestad) is helped throughout his harrowing journey by many brave people (Mads Sjøgård Pettersen, Marie Blokhus, Kim Jøran Olsen, et al.) as he struggles to evade an ambitious Nazi officer (Jonathan Rhys Meyers) and his men to make it to neutral Sweden with vital information during WWII.

“Godard Mon Amour” (NR) (2.5) [Subtitled] — An arty, intellectual, factually based, 107-minute film based on Anne Wiazemsky’s autobiography “Un an après” that delves into the unconventional love story of critically acclaimed, famous, controversial, revolutionary French director Jean-Luc Godard Louis Garrel) who smothered actress Anne Wiazemsky (Stacy Martin), who was sixteen years younger and the granddaughter of writer François Mauriac’s, when he married her in 1967 in Paris against a turbulent political time in France.

“Life of the Party” (PG-13) (3) [Sexual material, drug content, and partying.] — After her cheating husband (Matt Walsh) says he wants a divorce to leave her for a real estate agent (Julie Bowen) in this funny, well-paced, entertaining, star-studded (Maya Rudolph, Stephen Root, Christina Aguilera, Ben Falcone, Jacki Weaver, and Chris Parnell), 105-minute comedy, an Illinois housewife (Melissa McCarthy) decides to go back to college with her daughter (Molly Gordon) to finish her archeology degree and finds herself a hit on campus and sowing her wild oats with a hunky college student (Luke Benward).

“Overboard” (PG-13) (3) [Suggestive material, partial nudity, and some language.] — After a snobbish Mexican billionaire (Eugenio Derbez) accidentally falls from his yacht and winds up with retrograde amnesia off the coast of Oregon in this entertaining, fun-filled, witty, star-dotted (Eva Longoria, Swoosie Kurtz, and John Hannah), 112-minute remake of the 1987 comedy, a hardworking mom (Anna Faris), who has three precocious daughters (Hannah Nordberg, Alyvia Alyn Lind, and Payton Lepinski) and is studying to be a nurse, gets payback after the mean-spirited, entitled bachelor threw her and her carpet cleaning equipment overboard and tells him that he has been married to her for 15 years, has three children, and has a job as a blue collar worker.

“The Rider” (R) (4) [Language and drug use.] — Gorgeous cinematography highlights Chloé Zhao’s powerful, captivating, factually based, critically acclaimed, heart-tugging, 104-minute, 2017 western in which stubborn Lakota horse training cowboy and rodeo rider Brady Blackburn (Brady Jandreau), who lives with his widowed father (Tim Jandreau) and 15-year-old Aspergers’s afflicted sister (Lilly Jandreau) on the Pine Ridge Indian reservation in the Badlands of South Dakota, tries to find a new direction for his life after suffering a near fatal traumatic brain injury from a kicking horse while riding in a rodeo.

 

On DVD

 

“Babylon A.D.” (PG-13) (1) [Intense sequences of violence and action, language, and some sexuality.] [DVD only] — A boring, nonsensical, violent, disconnected, futuristic, 90-minute, 2008 thriller in which a no-nonsense mercenary (Vin Diesel) accepts an assignment from a big-nosed Russian mobster (Gérard Depardieu) to smuggle a mysterious, highly intelligent woman (Mélanie Thierry) and her butt-kicking escort (Michelle Yeoh) from a secluded monastery in China to New York City despite death threats and the political and religious tug of war between a scientist (Brian Lambert) and a misguided high priestess (Charlotte Rampling).

“College” (R) (.5) [Pervasive crude and sexual content, nudity, language, drug, and alcohol abuse.] [DVD only] — A vulgar, silly, groan-inducing, 94-minute, 2008 comedy in which three close-knit high school seniors (Drake Bell, Andrew Caldwell, and Kevin Covias) head to a college campus in high hopes of a wild weekend of partying but their plans are derailed when they accept the invitation of immature, mean-spirited college brats (Nick Zano, Gary Owen, et al.) to stay at their fraternity rather than the dorms.

“Disaster Movie” (PG-13) (0) [Crude and sexual content throughout, language, drug references, and comic violence.] [DVD only] — Lame dialogue and special effects dominate this unfunny, pathetic, inane, disastrous, and stupid satirical, 87-minute, 2008 comedy that spoofs a myriad of stars such as Amy Winehouse, Jessica Simpson, and Miley Cyrus and films, including “Iron Man,” “Apocalypto,” “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull,” “Juno,” “The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian,” “Hulk,” “High School Musical,” “Jumper,” “10,000 B.C.,” “Step Up,” “No Country for Old Men,” “Enchanted,” “Batman,” “Hellboy,” “Alvin and the Chipmunks,” “Kung Fu Panda,” “Superbad,” “Hancock,” “The Love Guru,” “Sex and the City,” “Speed Racer,” “Beowulf,” “Wanted,” and “Night at the Museum” as the feuding  star couple (Matt Lanter and Vanessa Minnillo) break up and get back together again while the earth is bombarded with asteroids.

“A Doll’s House” (G) (3) [DVD only] — Superb acting highlights this emotionally charged, star-dotted (Ralph Richardson, Edith Evans, and Anna Massey) 105-minute, 1973 classic Henrik Ibsen drama that chronicles the marital breakdown between a domineering bank manager (Anthony Hopkins) and his repressed wife (Claire Bloom) when a vengeful former employee (Denholm Elliott) blackmails her due to a fraudulent financial indiscretion during the late 1800s in Norway.

“Transsiberian” (R) (4) [Some violence, including torture and language.] [DVD only] — When a train-aficionado American hardware store owner (Woody Harrelson) and his camera-loving wife (Emily Mortimer) board the trans siberian train in Beijing bound for Moscow after volunteering with their church group and they find themselves befriending a mysterious vagabond couple (Eduardo Noriega and Kate Mara) in this enthralling, well-crafted, 111-minute, 2008 thriller filled with nail-biting suspense, the foursome unknowingly find themselves the target of a duplicitous Russian narcotics detective (Ben Kingsley) searching for a stash of heroin and a bundle of money.

“Tsunami: The Aftermath” (NR) (3.5) [DVD only] — While a journalist (Tim Roth) and a photographer (Will Yun Lee) try to document and chronicle the devastation and aftermath of the tsunami that hit Southeast Asia on Dec. 26, 2004, killing more than 200,000 people and a compassionate English relief volunteer (Toni Collette) and a British official (Hugh Bonneville) coordinate help for survivors in this gut-wrenching, heartbreaking, factually inspired, 186-minute, fictionalized 2006 HBO film, a distraught British couple (Chiwetel Ejiofor and Sophie Okonedo) search for their missing daughter (Jazmyn Maraso), a strong-willed Thai teenager (Samrit Machielsen) tries to stop developers from taking his family’s land, and a scared tourist (Gina McKee) tries to console her youngest child (George MacKay) and to get medical help for her injured son (Owen Teale) after the death of her husband (Morgan David Jones).

“Walker Payne” (R) (2) [Language, some sexuality, and disturbing images.] [DVD only] — After an Illinois miner (Jason Patric) is laid off from his job at the quarry and his angry ex-wife (Drea de Matteo) offers to hand over custody of their two precious daughters (Chelsea Lopez and Gabrielle Brennan) for $5,000 so that she can escape the depressed small town in this heartbreaking, downbeat, violent, 117-minute, 2006 film, he reluctantly and desperately accepts the offer of a slick, high-rolling gambler (Sam Shepard) to enter his loyal pit bull dog in illegal and vicious dogfighting competitions to the distain and horror of his bank teller girlfriend (Kadee Strickland) and his father (Bruce Dern) in 1957.

Film Critic Wendy Schadewald reviewed films in the Twin Cities since 1986, and has been a guest critic on KARE-11’s Showcase Minnesota, WCCO radio, and AMC-950 radio. She reviews more than 250 films annually and has been a film buff for as long as she can remember. To see more of her film reviews, log on to shortredheadreelreviews.com.

©1986 through 2018 by Wendy Schadewald.

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